Love Note – Eurovision

This Saturday sees the return of the Eurovision Song Contest and I could not be more excited. This year, I have excellent friend and historical Eurovision-watching comrade Annie coming to visit from Manchester, I am drawing up a Eurovision bingo game, making cultural food plans (pierogi, baguettes and olives amongst other foodstuffs), organising an office sweepstake at work, and have my Spotify playlist of past-Eurovision favourites on repeat. I am raring to go for the Grand Final in a couple of days’ time.

I have always loved Eurovision. It is funny whilst both trying to be and trying not to be; it is colourful and vibrant; appeals to the ridiculousness in us all; and offers the perfect excuse to have a bit of a party. It curiously manages to hold a number of different positions: it suspends reality, through its gaudy spectacle and earnest hilarity that feels so far removed from the grim and turbulent political times that we are currently living through (and have always lived through, to an extent). However, it also embodies the inclusivity and positivity absolutely required to make the world a more joyful and tolerant place. Seeing Europe come together on the same night to mutually revel in Europop music, dry ice, random pyrotechnics, Graham Norton’s sarcastic critiques and, in some cases, yodelling, warms the cockles of this soppy Remainer heart. I have often thought that it takes a certain amount of self-awareness or self-deprecation to watch and enjoy Eurovision: it’s a bit like laughing at yourself. Someone so stuck-in-the-mud and obsessed with control, power and image and all that, like Putin for example, probably don’t watch Eurovision. But you can imagine the world would probably be a better place if he did.

There are certain things about the show that are quintessentially Eurovision, but that some people find hard to understand and accept. Here, I want to help break these things down and offer a shift in perspective, introducing naysayers and cynics to Eurovision Logic. Here are some examples:

Normal logic: The show and, in particular, the round-the-houses voting system are time-consuming and extremely long. The show does run from 20:00 – 23:40 (a running time of 3 hours and 40 minutes) and it takes up all the prime-time coverage on BBC One. It’s a bit overkill.

Eurovision Logic: With the round-the-houses system, we get an insight into the humour, style and sensibilities of our European neighbours. When there is a time-lag, things get deliciously awkward, especially when the announcers in each country end up manically grinning or saying something wonderfully clichéd or just plain weird. I would also recommend watching all the performances, if you are able to, and working out which is your favourite, or getting involved with an office sweepstake. Actually being invested in at least one country makes the voting much more exciting and interesting. Multiple drinks will also help.

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Normal logic: Australia is not in Europe. Why is it in Eurovision? It doesn’t make sense and is stupid.

Eurovision Logic: Newsflash: Israel and Azerbaijan are not in Europe and have competed in Eurovision for very many years (and have both won). Even Morocco competed in Eurovision in 1980. Australia joined in 2015, to celebrate the competition’s 60th anniversary and had such a good time that they’ve decided to come back every year. What is there not to love about that? Lighten up. I think it is also a good idea to let people dwell in paradox for a while: life is all about ambiguity and uncertainty, things are never clear-cut, and Australia in Eurovision is a perfect metaphor for that. On a very deep level, somewhere, it makes absolute sense that Australia participates in Eurovision. I would love them to win and see the absolute existential flap people will, inevitably, get into. Guys, it’s going to be OK.

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Normal logic: Eurovision songs are cheesy pap and are the dregs of music

Eurovision logic: Yes, there are certain levels of cheesiness and corniness to the Eurovision song repertoire. My first impulse is to just embrace it and laugh along with it. All those songs about being ‘heroes’ and ‘grabbing the moment’ (both things Bowie sang about) are absolutely harmless and catchy as heck. My second impulse is to point out that there have been some amazingly mature songs in the competition, especially in recent years. There was The Common Linnets’ song ‘Calm After The Storm’ that came second for The Netherlands in 2014, missing out to Conchita Wurst’s absolute belter ‘Rise Like a Phoenix’; Belgium’s Loïc Nottet’s ‘Rhythm Inside’ in 2015 sounded like Lorde had written it; and the gorgeous, inimitable ‘Amar Pelos Dois’ sung by Portugal’s Salvador Sobral  won in 2017 and still gives me warm fuzzies. All truly, excellent songs. My third impulse tends towards the sassy: in the enduring and poetic words of last year’s winner, Netta, I’d rather dance with my dolls to the mother-bucka beat, than get all sour about it.

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So here’s to Eurovision 2019! It is a bit bizarre, but when has the bizarre also not been life-affirming and a little bit good for us? When not drinking all the drinks, eating all the European food and jigging around to all the songs, I’ll see you all on Twitter for the hilarious commentaries. I’ve heard that the singers from Iceland are some kind of BDSM group… let the wonderful chaos unfold.

[1] I would like to add as a small footnote that I am aware that Israel holding the competition is obviously very contentious, and look forward to seeing if the competition is used to make any protests or points, particularly in light of military action in Gaza in the past few weeks.

Love Note – Buffalo Cauliflower Wraps

*New Harping On food obsession alert*

I’ve introduced this blog to the delights of Tofu Thursdays: now I have another culinary favourite to add to my repertoire. Monday night has become Buffalo Cauliflower Wraps Night (the catchiest name you will ever find).

First and foremost, thanks go initially to my lovely friend Dee who runs a blog called ‘Estrella’ (www.estrellablog.com) and who introduced me to this amazing meal. Dee is a Psychology graduate, currently training to be a life coach. Her writing revolves around personal development, conflict resolution and many other brilliant things. Head to her blog to find out more.

I have long been a proponent of the fajita and the falafel wrap (if you’re in Manchester, get down to ‘Falafil’ opposite Manchester Metropolitan University on Oxford Road, the best falafel wrap for the lowest price you will ever find). These wrap-revolving meals are tasty, quick and easy to make, and ensure that dinner time is as interactive and fun as possible. Buffalo Cauliflower Wraps are an excellent variation and addition to the wrap oeuvre, especially if you are vegan or are thinking of cutting down on the amount of meat you eat. I’ve added chickpeas to add a bit more protein and have developed a vegan ranch dressing using cashew nuts.

Ingredients

Group 1 -Bulk

Cauliflower

Tin of chickpeas

A healthy dose of Buffalo hot sauce (or Peri Peri sauce if you’re desperate)

2tbsp of olive oil (or other oil variation)

1 tsp. of chilli powder

1 tsp. of garlic powder

1 tsp. of paprika

1 tbsp. of golden syrup

2 avocados

Lettuce: I opt for either sweet gem lettuce or romaine lettuce

Wraps

 

Group 2 – Salsa

4/5 salad tomatoes

1/4 tsp. of chilli flakes

1 tsp. of basil

 

Group 3 – Vegan ranch dressing

Bag of cashew nuts from Aldi

Water

1 tbsp. white wine vinegar

1 tsp. garlic powder

1tsp. onion powder

1 tbsp. dry parsley

1tbsp. dry chives

½ tbsp. dry coriander

Optional: 2 tbsp. sesame oil and dash of soy milk

 

Method

 

  1. Preheat oven to 220 degrees Celsius
  2. Place cashew nuts into a Pyrex bowl
  3. Boil kettle, pour over cashew nuts and fill the bowl
  4. Place a plate over the top of the bowl and allow to soak. Apparently the longer you soak the cashews the better, but I always forget and this turns out just fine
  5. In a large bowl, combine hot sauce (enough to cover the cauliflower, add more if necessary), olive oil, chilli powder, garlic powder and paprika
  6. Wash and chop up the cauliflower into sizeable florets. Add to the bowl
  7. Open the chickpeas and stir in with the cauliflower and other ingredients
  8. Pour the mixture into a baking tray
  9. Drizzle the golden syrup over the cauliflower and chickpeas
  10. Put into the oven for twenty minutes (until slightly crisp around the edges)
  11. Cube the avocados and place into a bowl
  12. Roughly chop up the lettuce and put onto a plate
  13. Dice the tomatoes and place into a bowl. Add the chilli flakes and basil to make a cool salsa
  14. Drain the cashew nuts
  15. Put them into a NutriBullet, blender or food processor
  16. Add white wine vinegar, garlic powder, onion powder, parsley, chives, coriander, sesame oil and soy milk. Add water until you get to the maximum line of the cup
  17. Whizz up until creamy. It may appear a bit sludgey but it doesn’t matter
  18. Transfer into a jug and pop into the freezer to help speed up the cooling
  19. Remove the cauliflowers and chickpeas from the oven and transfer them back into the original mixing bowl
  20. Put the wraps onto a plate and warm them up in the microwave for 30 seconds
  21. Move all of your plates and bowls to the dining table area
  22. Remove the vegan ranch dressing from the freezer
  23. Get wrapping

Buffalo Cauliflowers again

Love Note – Having a cold

Here’s the situation: a stranger breathed into my face on Monday (I work a people-facing job) and now the harbingers of disease are waving their red flags in my body. My throat has seized up, I’m sneezing constantly, my nose is blocked, I’m fatigued and the creeping dread of infirmity has descended on me like a dark cloud. I pine for the days when I wasn’t ill, cursing the daily hubris of complacency that prevented me from truly appreciating my health now that I can’t breathe, my limbs ache and my sneezes trumpet forlornly into the gloomy, snotty night.

I am coming to believe, however, that amongst all of this bodily dysfunction, I am being presented with a number of opportunities here. I can rage and throw myself a big pity party for the duration, which I am so tempted to do, or I can heed my body’s calls to slow everything right down. I can ask myself a question that I don’t really ask enough: what do I really need right now?

What can freak us out about being ill is that slowing down on a physical level can mean getting stuck in our heads, which can be challenging places to be. We live such fast-paced and distracted lives: all looking ahead to the next goal, the next weekend, the next project, and using our downtime to scroll mindlessly and binge on television, films and YouTube videos. I don’t think we are used to nurturing ourselves properly in those quiet moments we have on a regular basis, in that we don’t give ourselves a proper chance to rest, to be present, to just be with ourselves. As a result, this can make times when we are ill, and have no choice but to slow down, very uncomfortable. My being ill in the past has made me feel quite anxious, where I have begun to wallow in negative thoughts, am hit by big fears and feel lost and listless.

So again: what is needed? On a physical level I need water, lots of water. Vitamin C is also my best friend: I had a smoothie this morning made from peaches, blueberries, banana and grapes. I have kiwis waiting for me when I get home. Lunch comprised of leftover chickpea and spinach curry (thank you MW), where I’m hoping the heat will work its pain-relieving qualities and get some movement through this bunged up nasal situation. I have found that ginger (raw or in tea) is miraculous at counteracting nausea and nothing is as comforting as a bowl of soup and a hot cup of tea.

I might do some journaling or dialoguing with some of the thoughts and worries that flare up, starting by asking myself why it stresses me out so much when I get ill, why slowing down is so draining for me. If I can sit with and move through that discomfort for a bit, then I might be able to find some clarity and lightness. Practising gratitude is also such a worthwhile thing to do. Instead of feeling sorry for myself, I can take time to reflect on things big and small: like how bloody lucky I am to have such amazing people in my life, but also how much simple joy I get from a bright sunny day. Or doughnuts. What would I do without doughnuts?

I would be so tempted to spend all day binge watching Disney films or my beloved Real Housewives trash (and some room can definitely be made for one or two of these things), but binging in general is not a good idea. Instead, I could do a variety of nourishing things like reading, carving out time to meditate, preparing some writing for my blog, doing some colouring in my Vogue colouring book (a guaranteed way to unleash all my fashionable delusions of grandeur), taking a nice warm shower, having multiple naps if my body needs it and finally: fresh air. Obviously if you’re completely bed-ridden, this is nigh-on impossible: but I will always try and get some fresh air flowing by either going for the smallest of walks or making sure that a window is open.

Being ill is unpleasant, but it doesn’t have to be wasted time. In fact, it could be seen as an invitation to spend some better time with yourself. There are many things I know I can do to help relieve my symptoms and make sure that I attend to my emotional wellbeing in a healthy way. It’s easier said than done, but just trying to take these steps has got to be more productive than resorting to the old pity party.[1]

[1] Just an NB: a great friend often reminds me that unions fought for our rights to have paid sick leave. If you are ill, you have every single right to take whatever time you need to recover. It will mean you go back to work even fresher, you will be more present and your colleagues are not at risk of contracting your malady. Obviously if you’re really ill, get yourself to the bloody doctor.

Love Note – Tofu Thursdays

It may be a sign that I’m in the thick of my mid-late twenties, but there are few things I like more at the moment than routine and good food. November is being typically dark, cold and rainy; therefore, having a good weekly meal plan, easy yet creative recipes to hand and a hearty, hearty appetite is definitely a good way to be living life right now. The Harping On household’s ‘Tofu Thursdays’ are a case in point: no matter what we have for dinner over the rest of the week, on Thursdays we eat our favourite, delicious tofu meal and it is joyous every single bloody time. Where we might be scrabbling around for ideas on Tuesday or Wednesday, Thursday is a guaranteed good time. Work colleagues and friends have been subject to my tofu ramblings for actual years now, so I think I should commit this culinary tradition to my blog.

I discovered this recipe a couple of years ago whilst bored at work and Googling ‘fun vegan recipes’. It came up on some Buzzfeed list or other and after making it once, it became a beloved regular fixture. It is effectively tofu in a homemade peanut butter satay sauce (please see recipe below) but it always feels like so much more than that. It epitomises the simple joy I have discovered in making meals with fresh ingredients instead of relying purely on pre-made sauces. I am a bit of an undisciplined cook, so I rarely weigh all the ingredients: I choose instead to just chuck in as much or as little as I feel that day. This means that even though this meal is scheduled in every Thursday, it is slightly different every single time. And yet still so, so delicious. Don’t get me wrong, there have been a few disastrous attempts at this dish (including the satay getting burnt, too much Sriracha hot sauce blowing our collective heads off and the use of chia seeds in the satay that absorbed all the moisture and created a dry soddish mess). The kitchen, however, is an excellent place for experimenting and there is plenty of variety to be found within the structural confines of a favourite recipe.

Since becoming a vegetarian in September 2016, I’ve learnt so much about flavours, textures, nutrition and my own ability to cook tasty food. This meal has become my most confident and trusty and I am more than happy to share it with you all. I can’t guarantee that I’ll stop blithering on about it at work/home/the pub but, for me, it’s worth going on about. Happy Tofu Thursdays!

I have made my own tweaks to wherever the original recipe is now and it goes as follows:

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Ingredients

Group 1

1 tbsp coconut oil

0.5 tbsp oil (olive/red palmfruit/flaxseed etc.)

2 garlic cloves

A biggish hunk of ginger

 

Group 2

Firm/extra firm plain tofu

4 tbsp soy sauce

4 tbsp white wine vinegar

3 tbsp peanut butter

2 tbsp golden syrup

Healthy dousing of Sriracha chilli sauce

1 tbsp nutritional yeast

Pinch of salt and pepper

4 tbsp water

1 cup of cashew nuts

 

Group 3

Rice/bulgar wheat/cous cous

Petit pois

Sweet corn

Spring onions

 

Method

  1. Chop up the garlic and ginger
  2. Drop them into a pan with coconut oil and other oil – don’t turn heat on yet
  3. Chop the tofu into cubes and put them to the side
  4. Mix all the sauce ingredients from Group 2 except the cashew nuts in a food processor or blender (I use a Nutribullet)
  5. Start to heat the garlic, ginger and oils until they simmer
  6. Turn the heat up higher and add the tofu
  7. Cook the tofu, stirring continuously, until it starts to turn golden brown
  8. Pour the satay sauce over the tofu and add the cashew nuts. Keep stirring to ensure that the sauce gets quite thick and sticky, but doesn’t burn at the bottom of the pan (it’s quite a weighty mixture, so burning it is easy to do and utterly soul destroying)
  9. Whilst mixing the sauce, boil up some rice/bulgar wheat/cous cous
  10. Also start boiling some petit pois peas and sweetcorn
  11. When the satay is thick, turn off the heat
  12. Mix together the carbs, peas and sweetcorn
  13. Pour the satay on top
  14. Chop the spring onions into little bits and sprinkle on top
  15. Eat!